News

Pilot drops thousands of pingpong balls on interstate

Pilot drops thousands of pingpong balls on interstate

PINGPONG:A pilot who dropped 3,000 pingpong balls that were redeemable for prizes missed a crowd assembled for the stunt and instead hit a nearby interstate. Photo: clipart.com

BLACKFOOT, Idaho (AP) — A pilot who dropped 3,000 pingpong balls that were redeemable for prizes missed a crowd assembled for the stunt and instead hit a nearby interstate.

Organizers immediately called off the contest. Aaron Moon and helpers on Saturday told revelers at Blackfoot Pride Days not to risk retrieving the pingpong balls amid high-speed traffic because organizes still planned to pass out the prizes.

Most of the pingpong balls could have been exchanged for candy, but some were worth gift certificates up to $100.

Moon says a new pilot attempted the drop this year, but apparently didn’t understand that pingpong balls lose speed quickly and drop straight down.

Blackfoot Police Chief Kurt Asmus tells the Idaho State Journal that no charges are planned, but police plan to work with organizers next year.

Recent Headlines

30 mins ago in Entertainment

OPENING WEEKEND: ‘Captain America: Civil War’ is finally here

Fresh
10-overlay

Here's a look at some of the films set to open this weekend.

35 mins ago in National

Making headlines this week

Fresh
A member of the NATO parachute demonstration team lands during a change of command ceremony at NATO military headquarters in Mons, southern Belgium on Wednesday May 4, 2016. U.S. Army General Curtis  M. Scaparrotti was installed as NATO's 18th supreme allied commander Europe (SACEUR). The commander, by tradition an American general or admiral, is responsible for the overall direction and conduct of NATO's global military operations. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)

A look back at some of the biggest stories this week and the headlines you may have missed.

38 mins ago in Lifestyle, National

Anti-hunger group uses fake app to fool, educate

Fresh
18-overlay

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates 14 percent of Americans, or more than 17 million people, are what is called food insecure, meaning at times of the year, they are uncertain of being able to acquire enough food for their household.